Category Archives: Technology

Penalties

A key element of either Compliance or Governance (or both) is penalizing violations.  Otherwise, the rule is on paper only, and isn’t real.

“U.S. Steps Up Grid Defense,” The Wall Street Journal, August 6, 2018 A1. Government devising new penalties for foreign (and domestic) agents who hack into critical infrastructure.

Sounds good.  But might we be better off with a few more ounces of prevention (education, technology controls, testing, etc.)?  The “internal” controls.  By the time you’re penalizing folks, you’ve been hacked.

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Filed under Access, Compliance (General), Controls, Duty, Governance, Government, Interconnections, Internal controls, IT, Security, Technology, Third parties

Blockchain, again

“Blockchain Helps Track Web Ads,” The Wall Street Journal, July 13, 2018 B4.  Technology used to determine whether “views” are by humans or bots, and where the advertising dollars are going.

How do you track how much of your sales price you actually receive?  For online ad publishers, Blockchain may help.  Also helps the advertisers.

More information is good.  Accurate information, even gooder.

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Filed under Access, Accuracy, Controls, Data quality, Information, Internal controls, Technology, Third parties, Value

Privacy

“Alphabet, Apple Prodded On Privacy,” The Wall Street Journal, July 10, 2018 A3.  Congress asks how Google and Apple use “your” information, such as what you say and write and where you are.

Which is more interesting, the questions or the answers?

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Filed under Access, Controls, Corporation, Definition, Duty, Duty of Care, Governance, Information, Internal controls, Ownership, Policy, Privacy, Security, Technology, Third parties

Location information

Apparently, if you’re on Verizon, 75 companies know where your phone is.  Is that worth anything to anybody?  Who owns that information and who can sell/rent it?

“Third Parties Know Exactly Where You Are,” The Wall Street Journal, July 16, 2018 B4.

Well, I like to have Uber and Google Maps know where I am.  And FindMyPhone.  Who else?  Do I control that?

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Filed under Access, Controls, Corporation, Definition, Duty, Information, Ownership, Technology, Value

Progressive?

It’s one thing when an insurance company asks you to install an appliance that tracks your driving habits.  You can qualify for rate discounts.  But what if the car manufacturer installs an app that sends the data to the insurer?

“App Tracks Driving Habits,” The Wall Street Journal, July 6, 2018 B3.  Mitsubishi installs app and offers to arrange to send data to insurers.

Again, this looks like someone else stepping in and trying to make money from sharing your data, not theirs.  Will this, as this article says, lead to insurers economically forcing you to share this information?  How you drive is one thing; but this would also include where you go, and when.  And can be tied to your credit rating, ZIP code, age, gender, etc.

What’s this data worth to you?  More or less than what it is worth to Mitsubishi and the insurance companies?  What will they do with this data once they have it?  Will they keep it secure?  Do they do this on cars sold in Europe or, for that matter, Japan?  Both countries have significantly stronger privacy protections than the US.

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Filed under Access, Analytics, Controls, Information, Privacy, Security, Technology, Third parties, Value

Trade-off?

“Cheap Phones Grab User Data,” The Wall Street Journal, July 6, 2018 B1. Cell phones sold in developing countries with limited privacy protections loaded with programs that harvest data.

While the phone give free access to the Internet, they are loaded with apps that track the user’s location, run targeted ads, and send usage data to the phone manufacturers.  But the users aren’t given a choice, beyond whether they want a phone or not.

Is this similar to the Faustian bargain already made in developing countries, trading our privacy for access to Facebook or Google or Amazon?  At least we were given the choice.  Sort of.  And we have privacy laws.  Sort of.

 

 

 

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Filed under Access, Controls, Privacy, Security, Technology, Third parties, Value

Facial recognition

The suspect makes his fingerprints unreadable, and doesn’t have a wallet or other ID.  Who is he?

“Controversial Facial System Identifies Suspect,” The Wall Street Journal, June 30, 2019 A3. Facial recognition used to identify the shooter at the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, where five died.  A picture was run through the drivers license data base, and up popped his license photo.

Biometrics as information?  Role of technology in information governance?

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Filed under Accuracy, Collect, Data quality, Privacy, Technology, Use