Using information

“Shopping at Discount Stores Could Help Get You a Loan,” The Wall Street Journal, March 5 2019.  Artificial intelligence looks at unusual bites of information when making loan decisions.

What do credit card companies look at to decide whether to loan you money?  A lot of seemingly unconnected information.  Is that information you can affect?  Is that your information?

This is mostly Information, and the use thereof, although there may be a little Governance.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance

Information lifecycle

“Vatican to Open Archives on World War II Pope Pius XII,” The Wall Street Journal, March 5, 2019. Church opens archives from the World War II years.

While you’re alive, you may be able to control the distribution of some information.  After you die, control is harder.

So, Governance (when does your power to control end?) mutates over written Information that still remains after your death (or other departure).

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance

Kill the messenger

Speaking of information controls, ….

“After One Auditor Flunked Brazil Dam, Vale Found Another Who Passed It,” The Wall Street Journal, March 5, 2019.  Did dam owner fire an auditor who refused to certify a dam as safe? Dam burst, killing people.

How does your company deal with bad information?  Maybe the auditor should have brought chocolates.

Governance (by cutting off sources of independent opinions contrary to management’s desires) may not be the best way.  Is independent information worth more?  Can it be discounted without something “more”?

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Is chocolate information?

“How Accountants Break the Bad News About Tax Refunds: With Chocolate and Tissues,” The Wall Street Journal, March 5, 2019.  Prepping the client for bad news.

So, in a way, chocolate is an information derivative, or substitute, or precursor.  If your accountant preps you with chocolate, you know it can’t be good.  I guess this is also Governance, because the accountant is controlling your receipt-of-bad-information experience.

What other experiences are “managed” by the provider?

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance

Experience does not equal information, apparently

“Italy Allows Illegal Homes to Be Rebuilt, Earthquake Zone or Not,” The Wall Street Journal, March 4, 2019.  The headline says it all.

Leaving aside the impact of a government “permitting” the building of “illegal” homes, what does it say when that government allows the illegal homes to be rebuilt on the site of a recent earthquake?  Is convenience more important than either law or safety?  And does the Italian government thereby accept liability for deaths and damage from the next quake?

I see aspects of Governance (or lack thereof), Information (experience with quakes), and Compliance (impact of ignoring existing law).

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Sauce 4 goose, sauce 4 gander

“Democrats Adopt GOP Strategy in Fight for Trump Probe Information,” The Wall Street Journal, March 4, 2019. What information can the President withhold from Congress?

This is really more about Governance than either Information or Compliance.  Is this determined by the President, or is Congress a higher (i.e., not co-equal) power?  Or does the Constitution control?

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance

Managing your information

“Getting Into the 800 Credit Score Club Is Tough—Staying in Is Tougher,” The Wall Street Journal, March 4, 2019.  Steps people are taking to manage their credit scores.

Who knew you could aggressively manage your credit score?  Is that like massaging your SAT score? [Note: this is posted March 17, 2019, after the college admissions case broke. Ed.]

Seems to combine Information and Governance.

Leave a comment

Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance