Brain waves

“Scientists Use Artificial Intelligence to Turn Brain Signals Into Speech,” The Wall Street Journal, April 25, 2019.  Translating brain signals into speech.

Interesting use of Information (brain signals).

Bet you can think of some interesting implications.  Lie detectors? Foreign language learning?

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Filed under Theme Four: Use, Theme One: Information

Cost/benefit

“NSA Recommends Dropping Phone-Surveillance Program,” The Wall Street Journal, April 25, 2019.  The cost of storing it outweighs its value for intelligence, net of cost of defending the collection and retention.

So, it costs too much to store the information, versus its value.  Didn’t we all make that argument to justify a defensible deletion project?

Information – cost and value.  Basic Infonomics.

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance

Cost of privacy

“Facebook Sets Aside $3 Billion to Cover Expected FTC Fine,” The Wall Street Journal, April 25, 2019. Reserve to cover potential fine from privacy violations.

You tell the FTC that you won’t share user data without consent.  And then you share it anyway.  Oopsie.

So, Information (user data) shared without consent (Compliance) in violation of agreement with the FTC (Governance/Compliance). One question: is this fine (one quarter’s profit) sufficient to penalize this behavior by Facebook and deter similar violations by others?

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Deep pockets

“Brothers Involved in Smollett Case Sue His Attorneys for Defamation,” The Wall Street Journal, April 24, 2019.  Smollett’s lawyers accused of defaming the two Nigerian brothers in news interviews.

Generally, you can’t sue a lawyer for an accusation he or she makes in court.  But what he or she says to the news cameras is fair game.  And the lawyer is probably acting as the client’s agent in making those statements, so the client has exposure for the attorney’s acts.  But, for a change, the lawyers are the deep pockets.

So, clearly information.  And Compliance (with libel/slander laws).  And Governance, through the legal process.

 

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Q&A

Questions and answers are information, no doubt.  But who controls what questions can be asked?

“Supreme Court Reveals Deep Divisions on 2020 Census Citizenship Question,” The Wall Street Journal, April 24, 2019.  The Supremes to decide whether it’s okay for the Census to ask whether the responder is a citizen.

Leaving aside the political implications, one ponders not whether asking the question is a good idea but whether the Secretary of the Department of Commerce has the power to ask this question and, if so, whether that power has been properly exercised.  That is the Governance question.  Versus whether it is a good idea to ask the question.

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Shameless

Shameless self-promotion.

On April 23, I gave a presentation to the ARMA Houston Spring Conference on “Information Governance Trends 2018-2019.”  A copy of my slides, a draft version of the slides-plus-audio, and a spreadsheet with the 300+ headlines from The Wall Street Journal that were the source for this blog and be found at http://liipfertconsulting.com/news.html.

This stuff is all around us.

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Mistakes?

“Online Lender Prosper Settles Probe Over Misleading Investors,” The Wall Street Journal, April 20, 2019.  Company provided the wrong data to is investors.  For two years.

The error resulted in the company overstating its earnings.  Why do these errors never go the other way?

You invest in something, and rely on the company providing accurate information to measure your investment.  They overstate their results by not including certain deductions.  Then the suit for fraud.

Where is the failure in governance?  The company?  You?

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance