Platform rules

If you have a content platform, do you need to play nice(r) with the competition?

“Google Fined $1.7 Billion in EU for Restricting Rivals’ Ads,” The Wall Street Journal, March 21, 2019.  More money for prior practices affecting “the niche market of selling text ads on search results that appear on third-party websites.”  Paid $1.6 billion, while defending legality of practices.  Un huh.

When you’re a monopolist, you’re subject to different rules.  How do you have to handle “your” information when dealing with competitors or others?  Do you need more controls (Governance) in order to Comply?

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Face the music

“Publishers Sue Peloton for Use of Songs From Drake, Lady Gaga,” The Wall Street Journal, March 20, 2019.  Allegedly, only some songs properly licensed.

Oops.  You try to comply with the law in getting licenses from the right people, but fail.  So you use their information improperly and face a suit for $150 million, right before your IPO.

Do you have controls in place (Governance) to make sure you don’t use copyrighted material without a license (if necessary)?

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Filed under Theme Four: Use, Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Edges

Do the controls around “exceptions” open up your entire program?

“College Admissions Scandal Relied on More Students Using SAT Accommodation,” The Wall Street Journal, March 19, 2019.  Making allowances for a small group allowed cheaters to prosper.

You spend a lot of time developing controls to address the major risks.  I imagine that SAT and ACT both spend a lot of time to prevent cheating in the normal exam-taking process.  But what happened when they allowed exceptions?  Were the controls as robust as they needed to be?

Do you have any exceptions to your normal control processes around Information?  Should this be a wake-up call to review them?  Do procedures around those exceptions need to be at least as robust as those around your base case?  Do the granting of the exception and handling those “exceptional” students?  What percentage of the total do the exceptions represent?

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

A family affair

“How the National Enquirer Got Bezos’ Texts: It Paid $200,000 to His Lover’s Brother,” The Wall Street Journal, March 19, 2019.  What’s news worth?

What does it say when your own brother sells you out for a mere $200K?

Do you have controls that prevent family members from disclosing “your” information?  Do you have any texts worth that much?  Apparently it was worth that much to a competitor of Mr. Bezos’ paper.  Or to its advertisers.

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Filed under Theme One: Information, Theme Two: Governance

Precision matters

“FCC Tackles 911 Dilemma: What Floor Are You Calling From?,” The Wall Street Journal, March 18, 2019.  Will technology need to track your altitude?

Finding people calling 911 from a cellphone within a building can be problematic.  So the FCC is proposing to require that the information from your wireless phone include your altitude, and within 10 feet.

So, we have Governance by the FCC.  And Information, generated by your cellphone.  And Compliance, sort of.  And using the newly required information as well.

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Filed under Theme Four: Use, Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

Eat your heart out

Who owns the data about where you eat?

“Who Controls Diners’ Data? OpenTable Moves to Assert Control,” The Wall Street Journal, March 16, 2019. “The table-booking service will block restaurants from giving competitors access to diner data acquired through OpenTable unless they pay new fees, according to its updated client agreement and a copy of a new pricing plan viewed by The Wall Street Journal.”

I guess this goes a bit to the value of information.  Let’s see: the restaurant where you made the reservation doesn’t own that data, the app that provided it to the restaurant does.  But you don’t.

And OpenTable seems to recognize the value of the information it has collected and, either to protect its customers’ privacy or its own profits, OpenTable has established controls and is governing that information.

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Filed under Theme Four: Use, Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance

The new Press

Is social media as important as the New York Times and network news?

“Did Twitter Help Ground the Boeing 737 MAX?,” The Wall Street Journal, March 16, 2019.  What impact did public reaction to the Boeing crashes have on Boeing and the FAA”

The blog often points out how little control you have over your information once you post it on Facebook or similar platforms.  But what about a major company (and a government agency)?  How do they handle a public backlash that happens on Twitter?

Lots of Information being used and distributed.  But virtually no Governance or Compliance.  Lots of impact.  This blog has talked about the intersection of Information Governance with Crisis Management (although I would argue that the two topics are not separate).

It’s as though Twitter is the essence of a Free Press – lots of information and viewpoints from different people, some of who may be conflicted or honest and some of whom may not be.  Or the Mob, depending on your point of view.  How does one filter the wheat from the chaff?

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Filed under Theme Four: Use, Theme One: Information, Theme Three: Compliance, Theme Two: Governance